Birria (Mexican Stew) Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Birria (Mexican Stew)

As the weather cools down for us here in the DC area, my mind have moved from barbecues and light refreshing salads to more substantial meals and stews. We are huge fans of chili and pulled pork, but I wanted to expand our repertoire. Especially because I am prone to colds or falling under the weather as the seasons change, I wanted something that could help keep my sinuses clear with the help of capsaicin. (Check out the medical uses in this Wikipedia article—warning: not AIP friendly.)

For me, this is an ideal winter stew, and is much heartier than our hot and sour soup, which was my go to meal when fighting a cold up to now. We hope you’ll give it a shot, and enjoy it in a variety of ways.

Continue reading

Buffalo-Style Cashew Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Buffalo-Style Cashews

It’s football season, so I am admittedly slightly obsessed with buffalo-flavored everything (did you know that Buffalo Wild Wings has a great chart for what is gluten-free on their site? Perfect for going out for the game and navigating the menu). That being said, one of my favorite previous treats was Snyder’s of Hanover’s buffalo-wing pretzels. They’re greasy, salty, crunchy, and awesome—they just make me feel like garbage with the additives and wheat.

These cashews are a great way to get that kind of experience at home and make a fun project of it, too. The instructions have variations depending on how intense of flavor you want and level of crunchiness. We know you will love these in addition to your Sunday (and Saturday, and Thursday, and Monday) ritual, just so long as you don’t wipe your hands on your jersey.
Continue reading

Bolognese Sauce Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Bolognese Sauce

As far as I was concerned in college, bolognese was nothing more than browned ground beef drowned in tomato sauce. It was quick and easy to plop on top of a plateful of spaghetti, and it tasted pretty good. It was never as good as what I got in Italian restaurants, but in all honesty I was too busy and/or lazy to figure out what I was missing.

Lately, however, I have been craving pasta and Brent suggested we learn to make bolognese. So, I did some research and found a wide variety of approaches in cookbooks and on the internet. Some of my results: the meat was not always just ground beef (some recipes even included pancetta!), some recipes included wine, and just about every recipe used a different mixture of herbs and spices. Traditionally, bolognese is named after its rumored birthplace, Bologna, Italy, and is often also called ragù alla bolognese or just simply ragù (like the commercial brand). Dating back to at least the late 18th Century, this is a hearty sauce that comes with an interesting history.

We hope you enjoy our rendition of bolognese over zoodles or other veggies!
Continue reading

Fall Breakfast Muffins Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Fall Breakfast Muffins

As I rummaged through the refrigerator Saturday morning, looking for a little inspiration, the apples and carrots caught my eye. (I have mentioned more than once that I love apples, especially at this time of year when you can pick them fresh at the local farms.) I was craving something sweet. So, decided I would bake a delicious morning treat inspired by the season. We hope you enjoy these delicious fall breakfast muffins!
Continue reading

Waldorf Salad Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Waldorf Salad

Early fall is the season of apples for me, and I get excited to use all kinds in every way possible. So, when Brent suggested we try to create our own Waldorf salad–in which apples are a main ingredient–I was completely on board. The original Waldorf salad recipe is attributed to the dinning room manager of New York’s Waldof-Astoria Hotel in the late 1890s. It contained apples, celery, and mayonnaise, and was served on a bed of lettuce.

Soon thereafter, walnuts became another main ingredient and over the decades other ingredients have come and gone. Some common additions are chicken, turkey, dried fruits, and yogurt. I imagine that yogurt plays an integral role in helping the dressing stay light and flavorful. So, I wanted to recreate that experience, but keep it dairy-free.

This Waldorf salad is sweet and light, and can be served as a refreshing lunch, appetizer, snack or even dessert. (Yes, I said dessert. I had the leftovers as “dessert” for three straight dinners.) We hope you will enjoy it, too!
Continue reading