Bolognese Sauce Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Bolognese Sauce

As far as I was concerned in college, bolognese was nothing more than browned ground beef drowned in tomato sauce. It was quick and easy to plop on top of a plateful of spaghetti, and it tasted pretty good. It was never as good as what I got in Italian restaurants, but in all honesty I was too busy and/or lazy to figure out what I was missing.

Lately, however, I have been craving pasta and Brent suggested we learn to make bolognese. So, I did some research and found a wide variety of approaches in cookbooks and on the internet. Some of my results: the meat was not always just ground beef (some recipes even included pancetta!), some recipes included wine, and just about every recipe used a different mixture of herbs and spices. Traditionally, bolognese is named after its rumored birthplace, Bologna, Italy, and is often also called ragù alla bolognese or just simply ragù (like the commercial brand). Dating back to at least the late 18th Century, this is a hearty sauce that comes with an interesting history.

We hope you enjoy our rendition of bolognese over zoodles or other veggies!
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Fall Breakfast Muffins Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Fall Breakfast Muffins

As I rummaged through the refrigerator Saturday morning, looking for a little inspiration, the apples and carrots caught my eye. (I have mentioned more than once that I love apples, especially at this time of year when you can pick them fresh at the local farms.) I was craving something sweet. So, decided I would bake a delicious morning treat inspired by the season. We hope you enjoy these delicious fall breakfast muffins!
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Waldorf Salad Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Waldorf Salad

Early fall is the season of apples for me, and I get excited to use all kinds in every way possible. So, when Brent suggested we try to create our own Waldorf salad–in which apples are a main ingredient–I was completely on board. The original Waldorf salad recipe is attributed to the dinning room manager of New York’s Waldof-Astoria Hotel in the late 1890s. It contained apples, celery, and mayonnaise, and was served on a bed of lettuce.

Soon thereafter, walnuts became another main ingredient and over the decades other ingredients have come and gone. Some common additions are chicken, turkey, dried fruits, and yogurt. I imagine that yogurt plays an integral role in helping the dressing stay light and flavorful. So, I wanted to recreate that experience, but keep it dairy-free.

This Waldorf salad is sweet and light, and can be served as a refreshing lunch, appetizer, snack or even dessert. (Yes, I said dessert. I had the leftovers as “dessert” for three straight dinners.) We hope you will enjoy it, too!
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Sweet Potato Gazpacho Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free)

Sweet Potato Gazpacho

It’s late summer and that means the heat and humidity are high in the metro DC area. Still, with fall just around the corner, I have been eager to enjoy the comfort of soup. This weekend, we created a slightly sweet and tangy gazpacho. It’s hearty but smooth and bright, so you can eat it as an appetizer or a meal. We hope you savor our sweet potato gazpacho as much as we did!
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Easy Squid Salad Recipe (paleo, primal, gluten-free, dairy-free)

Easy Calamari (Squid) Salad

Squid is an ingredient that I vilified for a large portion of my life—probably until I was in my early teens. My mom’s insistence that I try all foods at least once, as well as a friend whose parents owned a restaurant, turned me on to calamari. There’s also been some recent news chatter about a certain substitute that some restaurants have allegedly been using as a cost savings measure (tldr; some claim pig rectum is being used, but current evidence points to hearsay and urban legend).

When our local supermarket had organically sourced squid, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to make a dish that didn’t include frying this delicious cephalopod. This salad is light and refreshing, and would easily work as an appetizer or first course, but can also work as a full meal itself. If you’re looking to put together a more exotic meal without a lot of effort, this is certainly a great way to go. Just note that cleaning and preparing squid can be a little time intensive, so if there is an option to buy them pre-cleaned (and you’re in a hurry), take advantage of it.

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